[syndicated profile] archaeology_in_eu_feed

Posted by David Beard MA, FSA, FSA Scot

ICELANDIC “SLÁTUR” A Scottish butcher argues the Scottish national dish, Haggis, was originally brought to Scotland by Vikings, making it a descendant of the Viking delicacy still eaten in Iceland, slátur. Photo/Arnþór Birkisson.

ICELANDIC “SLÁTUR” A Scottish butcher argues the Scottish national dish, Haggis, was originally brought to Scotland by Vikings, making it a descendant of the Viking delicacy still eaten in Iceland, slátur. Photo/Arnþór Birkisson.

A Scottish butcher who has spent the past few years researching Haggis recipes argues it dates back to the Viking invaders of the British Isles the UK newspaper The Telegraph reports. The paper argues the research of award-winning Scottish butcher Joe Callaghan, who has spent the last three years studying haggis shows “Scotland’s national dish is an ‘imposter’… invented by Vikings”. Callaghan also argues the original Scottish ingredient is deer, not sheep.
The "natonal dish of Scotand", invented by Vikings

Haggis is a dish very similar to the Icelandic delicacy slátur: A sausage made by stuffing a sheep's stomach with diced innards of sheep, liver as well as lungs and heart, mixed with a oatmeal, onion, pieces of sheep suet (solid white fat) as well as seasoning. Haggis is considered the “national dish” of Scotland, occupying an important place in Scottish culture and national identity.

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[syndicated profile] archaeology_in_eu_feed

Posted by David Beard MA, FSA, FSA Scot

Scotland’s famous national dish is an ‘imposter’ and has been faking it as native for centuries, says an award-winning butcher


Scotland’s famous national dish is an ‘imposter’ and has been faking it as native for centuries, says an award-winning butcher who has traced haggis and its recipe back to Viking invaders.

Joe Callaghan, of Callaghans of Helensburgh, Argyll and Bute, has been researching the savoury pudding for three years and claims that the evidence is clear - haggis should be made with deer, not sheep.

He also claims it was not invented by the Scots, but was instead left behind by marauding Norsemen as they plundered the Scottish coastline during the ninth century.

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[syndicated profile] jedediah_feed

I think it’s fascinating to observe toxic masculinity in action in Westerns.

(Some quasi-spoilers here for Shane (1953).)

In this latest example I’ve seen, the movie Shane, the boy (Joey) is desperate for a role model who can teach him to perform violent masculinity—at the start of the movie, Joey is hunting a deer, and he spends a fair bit of the movie running around with toy guns shouting “Bang! Bang! Bang!” over and over, and he insists that Shane teach him to shoot, and he keeps asking questions about who could beat up who, and he insists that Shane would never back down from a fight, and so on.

Presumably he got that model of What It Means To Be A Man from his culture. But he’s also strongly reinforcing that culture, because:

Shane keeps trying to not perform violent masculinity, but he’s pressed into it by (among other things) not wanting to let Joey down. (Same, in some ways, for Joey’s father Joe.)

So Joey is desperate to see the men in his life engage in violence and refuse to back down, and the men in his life don’t want to look bad in front of him or set him a bad example, and so there’s this vicious cycle reinforcing things.

(There’s a lot more than that going on for both Shane and Joe, of course. But Joey’s ideas seem to me to be pretty clearly a major driving factor for both of them.)

Shane tries a couple of times to gently suggest that Joey’s got the wrong idea about what a Real Man has to do, but that doesn’t work; various genre forces are conspiring toward the inevitable violent climax.

But the movie takes place (like many Westerns, I think) in this liminal period between the old violent world of the frontier and the new law-abiding world of civilization, and I feel like it’s trying to say that Shane is among the last of the old world, that he’s clearing a space for the new world to happen. But if that’s the intent, I don’t think it works. Joey doesn’t come out of the movie thinking that gunfighting is wrong; he comes out of it with all of his preexisting cultural ideas heavily reinforced.

And, of course, 125 years after the period of this story and 65 years after the movie was made, we’re still struggling with these same kinds of ideas, with boys and men striving to meet cultural expectations of masculinity and also reinforcing those expectations.

P.S.: Wikipedia says:

Stevens wanted to demonstrate to audiences “the horrors of violence”. [His] innovations, according to film historian Jay Hyams, marked the beginning of graphic violence in Western movies.

I’ll certainly believe that that was Stevens’s intent, but I’m not convinced that this movie succeeds in demonstrating the horrors of violence. I feel like it does more glorifying than horrifying.


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Pardessus de Viole

Oct. 22nd, 2017 12:00 am
[syndicated profile] met_art_feed
Pardessus de Viole
Nicholas Chappuy

Artist: Winslow Homer (American, Boston, Massachusetts 1836–1910 Prouts Neck, Maine)

Date: 1903
Medium: Watercolor and graphite on off-white wove paper
Dimensions: 13 15/16 x 21 3/4 in. (35.4 x 55.2 cm)
Classification: Drawings
Credit Line: Amelia B. Lazarus Fund, 1910
Accession Number: 10.228.1

Information about hundreds of thousands of works of art is available in The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Collection Database.

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© 2000–2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. All rights reserved.

Pardessus de Viole

Oct. 22nd, 2017 12:00 am
[syndicated profile] met_art_feed
Pardessus de Viole
Nicholas Chappuy

Maker: Nicholas Chappuy (French, Mirecourt 1730–1781 Mirecourt)

Date: ca. 1750
Geography: Mirecourt, France
Culture: French
Medium: Wood
Dimensions: Overall: 19 x 10 x 56.8cm (7 1/2 x 3 15/16 x 22 3/8in.)

56.8 cm overall length, 32.6 cm body length (bottom), 15.7 / 10.7 / 19.0 cm width of bouts (bottom), 13.2 cm neck.
Classification: Chordophone-Lute-bowed-fretted
Credit Line: Purchase, Frederick M. Lehman Bequest, 2006
Accession Number: 2006.504

Information about hundreds of thousands of works of art is available in The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Collection Database.

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© 2000–2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. All rights reserved.

Unread-books project update

Oct. 21st, 2017 06:18 pm
[syndicated profile] jedediah_feed

I started this project with about 350 unread mass-market paperbacks on my bookshelves, and I bought about 30 more shortly after starting the project. It’s hard to decide exactly what count to start with, because I also glanced at and discarded another 100 or so at the end of 2015 and the beginning of 2016. But let’s say I started the project with 380 unread MMPBs.

I’m now down to 179 to go, so I’m a little over halfway through.

…The numbers I have don’t add up. I’ve read (or more often glanced at and discarded, or lightly skimmed) about 60 MMPBs so far this year, plus a couple dozen books in other formats, and I got through 172 last year. I’m not quite sure how to reconcile all those numbers with each other.

But suffice it to say that after nearly two years of this project, I’m probably somewhere around halfway through, and my pace has slowed considerably over time. So it might be another two years or more before I’m done.

(And that’s not even considering the 560 or so unread books on my trade-paperback-and-hardcover shelves. I started going through those this year, very slowly, but probably won’t get serious about those until after I finish with the mass-market books.)

I continue to be glad to be doing this project. I’m not often encountering books or stories that I like, but it’s satisfying to get some closure on books that’ve been sitting on my shelves for 20+ years, and on books that I always meant to read, and on books by authors whose other work I’ve liked, and so on.

But it’s also a little demoralizing to think of continuing for the next couple years. As suggested in the abovelinked entry, I’m intentionally mixing in more recent stuff (which tends to be more to my tastes) this year, which helps; but it also slows down progress on the project.

One side effect worth mentioning: When I’m particularly interested in a given book, I’ve been buying it in ebook form, which lets me read it in more places and lets me highlight and search and so on.

(I am continuing to buy other books, too, of course. But most of my book-buying is ebooks these days. I’m avoiding thinking about the number of unread ebooks on my virtual bookshelves. I’m definitely reading/skimming books faster than I’m buying them, so at least the total unread number is going down over time.)

Anyway, mostly just posting this for my own future reference; I got curious today about numbers over time, and found that I hadn’t posted enough updates to be able to reconstruct various things, so I figured it was time for an update.

Edited a few minutes later to add: it’s definitely nice to watch the physical progress of this project, as the section of my bookshelves devoted to unread MMPBs gradually diminishes. It’s down to a little over five shelves now (well, four and two half-shelves), and after I get through another 20 or so books, it’ll free up a whole shelf for me to move old sf magazines onto, which will in turn free up more space in the larger-books-that-I’ve-read section. I have a whole plan about what moves to where as more space frees up over time.

[syndicated profile] lois_mcmaster_bujold_feed
So, as promised, here is the e-cover of the new Penric & Desdemona novella. It will be #6 in the current internal chronology (and publishing order.)



Cover art and design by Ron Miller.

The vendor-page copy will read:

"In this sequel novella to "Mira's Last Dance", Temple sorcerer Penric and the widow Nikys have reached safety in the duchy of Orbas when a secret letter from a friend brings frightening news: Nikys's mother has been taken hostage by her brother's enemies at the Cedonian imperial court, and confined in a precarious island sanctuary.

Their own romance still unresolved, Nikys, Penric, and of course Desdemona must infiltrate the hostile country once more, finding along the way that family relationships can be as unexpectedly challenging as any rescue scheme."

I don't have a firm release date yet, though I'm hoping for launch in not more than a few weeks. I will, of course, post the news here when it goes live.


Ron, by the way, has two books of his own out this month:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3...

and

https://www.amazon.com/Aliens-Complet...


Ta, L.

posted by Lois McMaster Bujold on October, 21

Shadow Unit: Down the Rabbit Hole

Oct. 21st, 2017 09:25 am
truepenny: artist's rendering of Sidneyia inexpectans (Default)
[personal profile] truepenny
[A/N: So I wrote this for Lewis Carroll's birthday in 2009. It's an AU (alternate universe) of Shadow Unit, in which one of the main characters, Chaz Villette, is imagining what his life would be like in an alternate reality where he wasn't quite who he is, and since it currently exists only on LiveJournal in Chaz's blog, I'm posting it here as well, so that it doesn't get lost. I'm very fond of it.

[If you don't know anything about Shadow Unit: (1) this stands on its own; (2) go check it out! Buckets of free fiction from me & Elizabeth Bear & Emma Bull & Amanda Downum & Leah Bobet & Will Shetterly & Steven Brust & Chelsea Polk.]
***
Read more... )
[syndicated profile] met_art_feed
At Sea off Kazusa (Kazusa no kairo), from the series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (Fugaku sanjūrokkei)
Katsushika Hokusai

Artist: Winslow Homer (American, Boston, Massachusetts 1836–1910 Prouts Neck, Maine)

Date: 1903
Medium: Watercolor and graphite on off-white wove paper
Dimensions: 13 15/16 x 21 3/4 in. (35.4 x 55.2 cm)
Classification: Drawings
Credit Line: Amelia B. Lazarus Fund, 1910
Accession Number: 10.228.1

Information about hundreds of thousands of works of art is available in The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Collection Database.

Photograph Credits | Terms and Conditions | Privacy Policy

© 2000–2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. All rights reserved.
[syndicated profile] met_art_feed
At Sea off Kazusa (Kazusa no kairo), from the series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (Fugaku sanjūrokkei)
Katsushika Hokusai

Artist: Katsushika Hokusai (Japanese, Tokyo (Edo) 1760–1849 Tokyo (Edo))

Period: Edo period (1615–1868)
Date: ca. 1830–32
Culture: Japan
Medium: Polychrome woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Dimensions: 9 1/2 x 14 7/8 in. (24.1 x 37.8 cm)
Classification: Prints
Credit Line: Henry L. Phillips Collection, Bequest of Henry L. Phillips, 1939
Accession Number: JP2963

Information about hundreds of thousands of works of art is available in The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Collection Database.

Photograph Credits | Terms and Conditions | Privacy Policy

© 2000–2017 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. All rights reserved.
[syndicated profile] bruce_schneier_feed

Posted by Bruce Schneier

Interesting essay by Danna Staaf, the author of Squid Empire. (I mentioned the book two weeks ago.)

As usual, you can also use this squid post to talk about the security stories in the news that I haven't covered.

Read my blog posting guidelines here.

New Worlds: Mourning

Oct. 20th, 2017 11:18 am
swan_tower: (*writing)
[personal profile] swan_tower
October's theme continues with a discussion of mourning customs. Remember, if you become a Patreon backer, you get a photo every week -- and at higher levels, the opportunity to request topics or read behind-the-scenes essays!

Post on Omniscient POV

Oct. 20th, 2017 01:34 pm
sartorias: (Default)
[personal profile] sartorias
Posting on the fly here--workshop still going on.

But recently Cat Rambo read my book Inda and asked me
>for a mini-interview on omni POV
. A subject I am always intensely interested in discussing.
[syndicated profile] bruce_schneier_feed

Posted by Bruce Schneier

Denuvo is probably the best digital-rights management system, used to protect computer games. It's regularly cracked within a day.

If Denuvo can no longer provide even a single full day of protection from cracks, though, that protection is going to look a lot less valuable to publishers. But that doesn't mean Denuvo will stay effectively useless forever. The company has updated its DRM protection methods with a number of "variants" since its rollout in 2014, and chatter in the cracking community indicates a revamped "version 5" will launch any day now. That might give publishers a little more breathing room where their games can exist uncracked and force the crackers back to the drawing board for another round of the never-ending DRM battle.

BoingBoing post. Slashdot thread.

Related: Vice has a good history of DRM.

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